Greater Loss of Central Adiposity from Low-Carbohydrate versus Low-Fat Diet in Middle-Aged Adults with Overweight and Obesity.

Citation
Barry, V. G., et al. “Greater Loss Of Central Adiposity From Low-Carbohydrate Versus Low-Fat Diet In Middle-Aged Adults With Overweight And Obesity.”. Nutrients.
Center University of Alabama at Birmingham
Author Valene Garr Barry, Mariah Stewart, Taraneh Soleymani, Renee A Desmond, Amy M Goss, Barbara A Gower
Keywords DXA, Insulin resistance, low-carbohydrate diet, Visceral fat, weight loss
Abstract

The objective of this study is to determine whether middle-aged adults prescribed a low carbohydrate-high fat (LCHF) or low fat (LF) diet would have greater loss of central fat and to determine whether the insulin resistance (IR) affects intervention response. A total of 50 participants (52.3 ± 10.7 years old; 36.6 ± 7.4 kg/m2 BMI; 82% female) were prescribed either a LCHF diet ( = 32, carbohydrate: protein: fat of 5%:30%:65% without calorie restriction), or LF diet ( = 18, 63%:13-23%: 10-25% with calorie restriction of total energy expenditure-500 kcal) for 15 weeks. Central and regional body composition changes from dual-x-ray absorptiometry and serum measures were compared using paired -tests and ANCOVA with paired contrasts. IR was defined as homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) > 2.6. Compared to the LF group, the LCHF group lost more android (15.6 ± 11.2% vs. 8.3 ± 8.1%, < 0.01) and visceral fat (18.5 ± 22.2% vs. 5.1 ± 15.8%, < 0.05). Those with IR lost more android and visceral fat on the LCHF verses LF group ( < 0.05). Therefore, the clinical prescription to a LCHF diet may be an optimal strategy to reduce disease risk in middle-aged adults, particularly those with IR.

Year of Publication
2021
Journal
Nutrients
Volume
13
Issue
2
Date Published
01/2021
ISSN Number
2072-6643
DOI
10.3390/nu13020475
Alternate Journal
Nutrients
PMID
33572489
PMCID
PMC7911139